• Corpus ID: 9554165

Paternal filicide in Québec.

@article{Bourget2005PaternalFI,
  title={Paternal filicide in Qu{\'e}bec.},
  author={Dominique Bourget and Pierre Gagn{\'e}},
  journal={The journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law},
  year={2005},
  volume={33 3},
  pages={
          354-60
        }
}
  • D. Bourget, P. Gagné
  • Published 1 September 2005
  • Medicine
  • The journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
In this retrospective study, relevant demographic, social, and clinical variables were examined in 77 cases of paternal filicide. Between 1991 and 2001, all consecutive coroners' files on domestic homicide in Québec, Canada, were reviewed, and 77 child victims of 60 male parent perpetrators were identified. The results support data indicating that more fathers commit filicide than do mothers. A history of family abuse was characteristic of a substantial number of cases, and most of the cases… 
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Maternal filicide in Québec.
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