Patch testing with a new fragrance mix – reactivity to the individual constituents and chemical detection in relevant cosmetic products

@article{Frosch2005PatchTW,
  title={Patch testing with a new fragrance mix – reactivity to the individual constituents and chemical detection in relevant cosmetic products},
  author={Peter J Frosch and Suresh Chandra Rastogi and Claudia Pirker and Thomas Brinkmeier and Klaus Ejner Andersen and Magnus Bruze and Cecilia Svedman and An Goossens and Ian R. White and Wolfgang Uter and Elena Gim{\'e}nez Arnau and Jean‐Pierre Lepoittevin and Jeanne Duus Johansen and Torkil Menn{\'e}},
  journal={Contact Dermatitis},
  year={2005},
  volume={52}
}
A new fragrance mix (FM II), with 6 frequently used chemicals not present in the currently used fragrance mix (FM I), was evaluated in 6 dermatological centres in Europe, as previously reported. In this publication, test results with the individual constituents and after repeated open application test (ROAT) of FM II are described. Furthermore, cosmetic products which had caused a contact dermatitis in patients were analysed for the presence of the individual constituents. In 1701 patients, the… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Allergic contact dermatitis caused by farnesol: clinical relevance
TLDR
Predictive and clinical elicitation data do not document a clear causative determination that farnesol is a frequent contact allergen, and detailed clinical relevance and patient studies should clarify the clinical problem farNESol represents.
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References

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Patch testing with a new fragrance mix detects additional patients sensitive to perfumes and missed by the current fragrance mix
TLDR
The new FM II detects additional patients sensitive to fragrances missed by FM I; the number of false‐positive reactions is lower with FM II than with FM I, and the medium concentration, 14% FM II, seems to be the most appropriate diagnostic screening tool.
Testing with fine fragrances in eczema patients
TLDR
More irritant reactions were found to the wet, non‐evaporated form of the fragrances compared with the dried form, while the method of testing did not significantly influence the number of positive reactions.
Fragrance allergy in patients with hand eczema – a clinical study
TLDR
The study found that fragrance allergy could be a common problem in patients with eczema on the hands, and established a new selection of fragrances, including 14 known fragrance allergens present in products to which hand exposure would occur.
Patch testing with fine fragrances: comparison with fragrance mix, balsam of Peru and a fragrance series
TLDR
Findings indicate that testing with fine fragrances can add to the evaluation of fragrance‐sensitive patients as well as the standard patch test series, which is currently being evaluated for eczema patients.
The fragrance mix and its constituents: a 14‐year material
TLDR
Results from 14 years of patch testing with the fragrance mix and its constituents are reviewed and a significant decrease in the frequency of reaction to cinnamic aldehyde was registered, at the same time as the test concentration was reduced from 2% to 1% pet.
Suspected fragrance allergy requires extended patch testing to individual fragrance allergens
TLDR
FM is an accurate screen for fragrance contact sensitivity, however, patch testing to an extended series is needed if there is clinical suspicion of perfume allergy, as otherwise about 7% of patients allergic to fragrances will be missed.
Lyral® is an important sensitizer in patients sensitive to fragrances
TLDR
Lyral® was identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry in some products which had caused an allergic contact dermatitis in four typical patients who showed a patch test positive to Lyral® and negative or doubtful to FM.
Preliminary Results on the Effectiveness of Two Forms of Fragrance Mix as Screening Agents for Fragrance Sensitivity
2455 consecutive patch test patients were tested to two separate fragrance mixes: one the standard 8% Hermal/Larsen fragrance mix and the other a new 9.5% Hausen mix containing dihydrocoumarin and
Frequency of false‐negative reactions to the fragrance mix
TLDR
It is concluded that the currently used concentration of the mix (8 × 1%) not infrequently results in false‐negative reactions, and that further research should be done to overcome this problem.
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TLDR
A significant decline in sensitization to the FM is reported for the first time, very probably due to a reduced exposure (less potent allergens used in fine fragrances, possibly less use of natural ingredient‐based cosmetics and lowered use concentration of important fragrance allergens).
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