Patch‐Test Results of the North American Contact Dermatitis Group 2005‐2006

@article{Zug2009PatchTestRO,
  title={Patch‐Test Results of the North American Contact Dermatitis Group 2005‐2006},
  author={K. Zug and E. Warshaw and J. Fowler and H. Maibach and D. Belsito and M. Pratt and D. Sasseville and F. Storrs and James S. Taylor and T. Mathias and V. Deleo and R. Rietschel},
  journal={Dermatitis},
  year={2009},
  volume={20},
  pages={149–160}
}
Background The North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) tests patients who have suspected allergic contact dermatitis with a broad series of screening allergens, and publishes periodic reports of its data. Objective To report the NACDG patch‐test results from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2006, and to compare results to pooled test data from the previous 10 years. Methods Standardized patch testing with 65 allergens was used at 13 centers in North America. Chi‐square statistics were… Expand
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The findings of patch testing from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2002 reinforce the need for a more comprehensive group of diagnostic allergens than those found in the standard screening kits. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Females were more likely to have an allergic reaction associated with a cosmetic source than were male patients, and head and neck involvement was significantly higher in female patients than in male patients. Expand
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