Passive and Active Flow Control by Swimming Fishes and Mammals

@article{Fish2006PassiveAA,
  title={Passive and Active Flow Control by Swimming Fishes and Mammals},
  author={Frank E. Fish and George V. Lauder},
  journal={Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics},
  year={2006},
  volume={38},
  pages={193-224}
}
  • F. Fish, G. Lauder
  • Published 2006
  • Engineering, Environmental Science, Biology
  • Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics
What mechanisms of flow control do animals use to enhance hydrodynamic performance? Animals are capable of manipulating flow around the body and appendages both passively and actively. Passive mechanisms rely on structural and morphological components of the body (i.e., humpback whale tubercles, riblets). Active flow control mechanisms use appendage or body musculature to directly generate wake flow structures or stiffen fins against external hydrodynamic loads. Fish can actively control fin… 
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