Partner choice creates competitive altruism in humans

@article{Barclay2006PartnerCC,
  title={Partner choice creates competitive altruism in humans},
  author={Pat Barclay and Robb Willer},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2006},
  volume={274},
  pages={749 - 753}
}
  • Pat Barclay, Robb Willer
  • Published 7 March 2007
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Reciprocal altruism has been the backbone of research on the evolution of altruistic behaviour towards non-kin, but recent research has begun to apply costly signalling theory to this problem. In addition to signalling resources or abilities, public generosity could function as a costly signal of cooperative intent, benefiting altruists in terms of (i) better access to cooperative relationships and (ii) greater cooperation within those relationships. When future interaction partners can choose… 

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