• Corpus ID: 81547475

Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act

@inproceedings{Hukuk2010PartialBirthAB,
  title={Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act},
  author={Hukuk},
  year={2010}
}
  • Hukuk
  • Published 22 October 2010
  • Medicine
This legislation would ban a particularly brutal and inhumane abortion method in which the child is removed from the womb feet-first and delivered except for the head. The abortionist thrusts scissors into the base of the child’s skull, inserts a catheter through the opening, and suctions out the child’s brain. This procedure is never medically necessary. Many recognize partial-birth abortion for what it is: infanticide. 

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