• Corpus ID: 17795426

Part of the game: Changing level creation to identify and filter low quality user-generated levels

@inproceedings{Hicks2014PartOT,
  title={Part of the game: Changing level creation to identify and filter low quality user-generated levels},
  author={Andrew Hicks and Veronica Catet{\'e} and Tiffany Barnes},
  booktitle={FDG},
  year={2014}
}
While there are many potential benefits of user-generated content for serious games, the variability of that content’s quality poses a serious problem. In our game, BOTS, players can create puzzles which are shared with other users. However, other players often find these puzzles irrelevant, unplayable, too difficult, or simply boring. To avoid frustrating players with low-quality puzzles, we have implemented a “Solve and Submit” process, where a player must “set the bar” for their level by… 
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