Parsing the Behavioral and Brain Mechanisms of Third-Party Punishment

@article{Ginther2016ParsingTB,
  title={Parsing the Behavioral and Brain Mechanisms of Third-Party Punishment},
  author={Matthew R Ginther and Richard J Bonnie and Morris B Hoffman and Francis X. Shen and Kenneth W Simons and Owen D Jones and Ren{\'e} Marois},
  journal={The Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={2016},
  volume={36},
  pages={9420 - 9434}
}
The evolved capacity for third-party punishment is considered crucial to the emergence and maintenance of elaborate human social organization and is central to the modern provision of fairness and justice within society. Although it is well established that the mental state of the offender and the severity of the harm he caused are the two primary predictors of punishment decisions, the precise cognitive and brain mechanisms by which these distinct components are evaluated and integrated into a… Expand
Neurobiological Mechanisms of Responding to Injustice
TLDR
Using a novel behavioral paradigm, specific brain networks are identified, a computational model of punishment is developed, and it is found that administrating the neuropeptide oxytocin increases the administration of low punishments of norm violations in particular. Expand
Brain responses to social punishment: a meta-analysis
TLDR
This study provides an integrative view on brain responses to social punishment by using coordinate-based fMRI meta-analysis and revealed concordant activation in the bilateral claustrum, right interior frontal and left superior frontal gyri. Expand
An fMRI investigation of the intention-outcome interactions in second- and third-party punishment.
TLDR
Specific psychological and neural mechanisms of intention-outcome interactions between SPP and TPP are demonstrated -helping to unravel the complex neurocognitive processes of costly punishment. Expand
Soft on crime: Patients with ventromedial prefrontal cortex damage allocate reduced third-party punishment to violent criminals
TLDR
Patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), compared to other neurological patients and healthy adult participants, allocate more lenient third-party punishment to criminals who commit emotionally-evocative, violent crimes, and negative emotion influences third- party punishment allocation particularly for scenarios involving physical harm to another. Expand
The Neuroscience of Blame and Punishment
In the last five years, a great deal has been learned about how human brains address the social problem of punishing wrongdoers. Although it is far too early to be confident that these insights willExpand
Who initiates punishment, who joins punishment? Disentangling types of third‐party punishers by neural traits
TLDR
By using a neural trait approach, this work was able to differentiate these three types clearly based on their neural signatures, allowing us to shed light on the underlying psychological mechanisms. Expand
The behavioral and neural basis of empathic blame
TLDR
Using fMRI, it is found that the ‘empathy for pain’ network was involved in encoding harmful outcomes and integrating harmfulness information for different types of moral judgments, and individual differences in the extent to which this network was active during encoding and integration of harmfulnessInformation determined severity ofmoral judgments. Expand
Social hierarchies in third-party punishment: A behavioral and ERP study
TLDR
Participants consider unfair offers proposed to high-status recipients as more norm-violating and they may evaluate the offers from the perspective of the recipient, as well as consider the offers proposed when the offer was fair and the recipient had medium-status. Expand
When morality opposes the law: An fMRI investigation into punishment judgments for crimes with good intentions
TLDR
FMRI data revealed that the right temporoparietal junction plays a crucial role in translating the perpetrators’ mental states into the punishment ratings and a cognitive control role of the rdlPFC in resolving moral conflicts during legal judgments. Expand
Moral outrage drives the interaction of harm and culpable intent in third-party punishment decisions.
TLDR
It is shown that-unlike anger, contempt, and disgust-moral outrage is evoked by the integration of culpable intent and severe harm, and that the expression of moral outrage alone mediates the relationship between this integrative process and punishment decisions. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 68 REFERENCES
The Neural Correlates of Third-Party Punishment
TLDR
Activity within regions linked to affective processing predicted punishment magnitude for a range of criminal scenarios and activity in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex distinguished between scenarios on the basis of criminal responsibility, suggesting that it plays a key role in third-party punishment. Expand
Corticolimbic gating of emotion-driven punishment
TLDR
Using fMRI, it is found that emotionally graphic descriptions of harmful acts amplify punishment severity, boost amygdala activity and strengthen amygdala connectivity with lateral prefrontal regions involved in punishment decision-making. Expand
The roots of modern justice: cognitive and neural foundations of social norms and their enforcement
TLDR
This commentary outlines some potential cognitive and neural processes that may underlie the ability to learn norms, to follow norms and to enforce norms through third-party punishment and proposes that such processes depend on several domain-general cognitive functions that have been repurposed, through evolution's thrift, to perform these roles. Expand
From Blame to Punishment: Disrupting Prefrontal Cortex Activity Reveals Norm Enforcement Mechanisms
TLDR
DLPFC rTMS affects punishment decision making by altering the integration of information about culpability and harm, and fMRI revealed punishment-selective DLPFC recruitment, suggesting that these two facets of norm-based decision making are neurobiologically dissociable. Expand
Integrative Moral Judgment: Dissociating the Roles of the Amygdala and Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex
TLDR
Findings support the hypothesis that the amygdala provides an affective assessment of the action in question, whereas the vmPFC integrates that signal with a utilitarian assessment of expected outcomes to yield “all things considered” moral judgments. Expand
Neural Substrates of Intention–Consequence Integration and Its Impact on Reactive Punishment in Interpersonal Transgression
TLDR
Investigating the neural substrates underlying the processing of intention and consequence and its bearing on reactive punishment demonstrates that theprocessing of intention may gate the emotional responses to transgression and regulate subsequent reactive punishment. Expand
Influence of bodily harm on neural correlates of semantic and moral decision-making
TLDR
Findings might be a correlate of limited generation of the semantic and emotional context in the anterior temporal poles during the evaluation of actions of another agent related to violence that is made with respect to the norms and values guiding the authors' behavior in a community. Expand
Disrupting the right prefrontal cortex alters moral judgement.
TLDR
Results reveal an increase of the probability of utilitarian responses during objective evaluation of moral dilemmas in the rTMS group, which suggests that the right DLPFc function not only participates to a rational cognitive control process, but also integrates emotions generated by contextual information appraisal, which are decisive for response selection in moral judgements. Expand
Diminishing Reciprocal Fairness by Disrupting the Right Prefrontal Cortex
TLDR
It is shown that disruption of the right, but not the left, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) by low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation substantially reduces subjects' willingness to reject their partners' intentionally unfair offers, which suggests that subjects are less able to resist the economic temptation to accept these offers. Expand
Aversive for Me, Wrong for You: First‐person Behavioral Aversions Underlie the Moral Condemnation of Harm
Many studies attest to the critical role of affect in the condemnation of harmful actions, but few attempt to identify the precise representations underlying this affective response. We propose aExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...