Parkinson's disease may be due to failure of melanin in the Substantia Nigra to produce molecular hydrogen from dissociation of water, to protect the brain from oxidative stress.

Abstract

Melanin, a hybrid electronic/ionic conductor may have the potential to split the water molecule into molecular hydrogen and molecular oxygen. Molecular hydrogen is an antioxidant and may be instrumental in preventing the excessive oxidation leading to Parkinson's disease. Melanin, located in the Substantia Nigra, deteriorates in Parkinson's disease so may be related to the development and progression of the disease, since molecular hydrogen would no longer be generated as it deteriorates. Environmental toxins, thought to be related to development of Parkinson's disease, may cause deterioration of intrinsic melanin, since it is a chelator which would collect such environmental contaminants, but its function of splitting the water molecule into molecular hydrogen and oxygen could be effected as a consequence. Restoring melanin function or providing supplemental molecular hydrogen might be potential treatments for Parkinson's disease.

DOI: 10.1016/j.mehy.2014.01.013

Cite this paper

@article{Brenner2014ParkinsonsDM, title={Parkinson's disease may be due to failure of melanin in the Substantia Nigra to produce molecular hydrogen from dissociation of water, to protect the brain from oxidative stress.}, author={Steven R. Brenner}, journal={Medical hypotheses}, year={2014}, volume={82 4}, pages={503} }