Parenting styles of abusive mothers in group-living rhesus macaques

@article{Maestripieri1998ParentingSO,
  title={Parenting styles of abusive mothers in group-living rhesus macaques},
  author={Dario Maestripieri},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1998},
  volume={55},
  pages={1-11}
}
  • D. Maestripieri
  • Published 31 January 1998
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Animal Behaviour
Maternal abuse of offspring in group-living monkeys was investigated to assess whether abuse of infants can be interpreted as an adaptive reduction of parental expenditure or as a behavioural pathology. I compared the parenting styles of 10 abusive and 10 non-abusive rhesus macaque, Macaca mulatta, mothers living in three large captive groups over the first 12 weeks of infant life. I also analysed the social interactions between mothers and infants and other individuals. Abusive females scored… Expand
Behavioral and environmental correlates of infant abuse in group- living pigtail macaques
The present study investigated the context of occurrence of infant abuse and the behavior of abusive mothers and their infants in pigtail macaques (Macaca nemestrina). Subjects were 8 abusive mothersExpand
Consistency and change in the behavior of rhesus macaque abusive mothers with successive infants.
TLDR
Similarities were found in the temporal course of infant abuse, the use of the most common pattern of abuse, and some measures of parenting style, notably those reflecting maternal protectiveness in rhesus macaque mothers. Expand
Maternal care patterns and behavioral development of rhesus macaque abused infants in the first 6 months of life.
We investigated the maternal care patterns of rhesus macaque mothers who physically abuse their infants, and compared their infants' behavior to that of nonabused infants. Parametric andExpand
Fatal attraction: interest in infants and infant abuse in rhesus macaques.
  • D. Maestripieri
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1999
TLDR
The results of this study indicate that abusive mothers are highly attracted to infants in general but that infant abuse is a phenomenon specific to their own offspring. Expand
Hormones and behavior in rhesus macaque abusive and nonabusive mothers: 2. Mother–infant interactions
TLDR
Pregnancy or lactation hormones are unlikely to be one of the main determinants of abusive behavior, endocrine variables may interact with personality characteristics or environmental factors in causing this phenomenon. Expand
Early experience affects the intergenerational transmission of infant abuse in rhesus monkeys.
  • D. Maestripieri
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2005
TLDR
Results suggest that the intergenerational transmission of infant abuse in rhesus monkeys is the result of early experience and not genetic inheritance, and the extent to which the effects ofEarly experience on the intergeneration transmission of abusive parenting are mediated by social learning or experience-induced physiological alterations remains to be established. Expand
Neuroendocrine Mechanisms Underlying the Intergenerational Transmission of Maternal Behavior and Infant Abuse in Rhesus Macaques
TLDR
Findings provide evidence that maternal rejection and infant abuse are transmitted across generations and suggest that experience-induced, long-termalterations in brain serotonergic function may play an important role in the intergenerational transmission of normal and abnormal parenting. Expand
Early maternal rejection affects the development of monoaminergic systems and adult abusive parenting in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).
TLDR
Low serotonergic function resulting from early exposure to high rates of maternal rejection plays a role in the intergenerational transmission of infant abuse in rhesus monkeys. Expand
Neurobiological characteristics of rhesus macaque abusive mothers and their relation to social and maternal behavior
TLDR
Higher CSF concentrations of CRH, 5-HIAA and MHPG concentrations were associated with anti-social behavior patterns including a high frequency of maternal aggression, infant rejection, and a low frequency of contacts received from other individuals. Expand
Infant abuse runs in families of group-living pigtail macaques.
TLDR
This study provides the first evidence of genealogical effects on infant abuse in nonhuman primates and suggests that this phenomenon could represent a good animal model for studying the etiology of child abuse and neglect. Expand
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The present study investigated the context of occurrence of infant abuse and the behavior of abusive mothers and their infants in pigtail macaques (Macaca nemestrina). Subjects were 8 abusive mothersExpand
Infant abuse associated with psychosocial stress in a group‐living pigtail macaque ( Macaca nemestrina) Mother
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TLDR
This study provides the first evidence of genealogical effects on infant abuse in nonhuman primates and suggests that this phenomenon could represent a good animal model for studying the etiology of child abuse and neglect. Expand
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This study investigated maternal abuse and neglect of offspring in a large population of rhesus monkeys over a period of 29 years. Abuse and neglect did not occur together and were associated withExpand
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In many species of non-human primates, the mother plays very important roles in the behavioral development of its offspring. It is needless to say that its positive aspects of satisfying physical andExpand
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This study investigated early interactions between 28 rhesus macaque, Macaca mulatta, mothers and their infants living in captive social groups to assess whether mothers actively encouraged theirExpand
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Seemingly contradictory results on the relationship between maternal condition and the quality of maternal care can be resolved by the hypothesis that maternal rejection is a U-shaped function ofExpand
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TLDR
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