Parenteral lipid emulsions in paediatrics

@article{Krohn2006ParenteralLE,
  title={Parenteral lipid emulsions in paediatrics},
  author={K. Krohn and B. Koletzko},
  journal={Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care},
  year={2006},
  volume={9},
  pages={319–323}
}
  • K. Krohn, B. Koletzko
  • Published 2006
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care
Purpose of reviewLipid emulsions are crucial for providing essential fatty acids and energy in infants and children requiring parenteral nutrition. There is ongoing debate about the optimal composition of lipid emulsions and the optimal timing for introducing lipids to the parenteral nutrition of premature infants in order to enhance the benefits and to minimize the risk of complications. Recent findingsSeveral studies have investigated the effects of early compared with late administration of… Expand
The use of alternative lipid emulsions in paediatric and neonatal parenteral nutrition
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Comparison of lipid emulsions on antioxidant capacity in preterm infants receiving parenteral nutrition
TLDR
The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the effects of the standard soybean oil‐ based and olive oil‐based i.v. lipid emulsions on oxidative stress, determined by total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and to investigate the safety of the use of these two emulsion in terms of biochemical indices. Expand
Growth and Fatty Acid Profiles of VLBW Infants Receiving a Multicomponent Lipid Emulsion From Birth
TLDR
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Safety and Efficacy of Parenteral Fish Oil–Containing Lipid Emulsions in Premature Neonates
TLDR
The level of docosahexaenoic acid is efficiently improved by FO lipid emulsions, and the changes observed in eicosapentaenoic Acid and arachidonic acid remain to be clarified. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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