Parenteral estrogen versus combined androgen deprivation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer: Part 2. Final evaluation of the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5

@article{Hedlund2008ParenteralEV,
  title={Parenteral estrogen versus combined androgen deprivation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer: Part 2. Final evaluation of the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5},
  author={Per Olov Hedlund and J. Damber and I. Hagerman and S. Haukaas and P. Henriksson and P. Iversen and R. Johansson and P. Klarskov and F. Lundbeck and F. Rasmussen and E. Varenhorst and J. Viitanen},
  journal={Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology},
  year={2008},
  volume={42},
  pages={220 - 229}
}
Objective. To compare parenteral estrogen therapy in the form of high-dose polyestradiol phosphate (PEP; Estradurin®) with combined androgen deprivation (CAD) in the treatment of prostate cancer patients with skeletal metastases. The aim of the study was to compare anticancer efficacy and adverse events, especially cardiovascular events. Material and methods. In total, 910 eligible patients with T0–4, NX, M1, G1–3 prostate cancer with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of… Expand
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Parenteral Estrogen versus Combined Androgen Deprivation in the Treatment of Metastatic Prostatic Cancer - Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5
TLDR
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The current parenteral estrogen regimen seems to be of comparable efficacy and cardiovascular safety as TAA in terms of overall survival and PEP has by far the lowest drug cost and also the lowest cumulative direct costs and thus has the highest cost-effectiveness. Expand
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In locally advanced (M0) and histologically well or moderately differentiated tumours, LHRH agonist therapy was considerably more effective than oestrogen as regards time to progression of the carcinoma, but in metastatic (M1) and Histologically poorly differentiated tumour both methods gave similar results. Expand
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In patients with locally advanced prostatic cancer, PEP therapy is associated with a statistically significantly higher risk of CV complications compared to OE, and no association was observed between pretreatment medication and CV complications. Expand
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