Parental investment, mate desertion and a fallacy

@article{Dawkins1976ParentalIM,
  title={Parental investment, mate desertion and a fallacy},
  author={Richard Dawkins and Tamsie R. Carlisle},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1976},
  volume={262},
  pages={131-133}
}
TRIVERS1 defines parental investment as “any investment by the parent in an individual offspring that increases the offspring's chance of surviving … at the cost of the parent's ability to invest in other offspring”. He has cleverly used this definition to elucidate many outstanding problems in social ethology1–3. But one of his most appealing usages of it is fallacious. 
ALife investigation of parental investment in reproductive strategies
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An ALife simulation is used to investigate the effect of explicit, numerical parental investments on two reproductive strategies of interest -- consensual mating and rape and demonstrates the potential of an ALife approach to evolutionary psychology.
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Most parent birds face the decision of whether to spend time and energy caring for their offspring or to conserve their resources to survive and breed later. Should a parent care for the young or
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Many organisms nourish and care for their oospring, boosting the oospring's reproductive potential. Trivers (1972) recognized that such parental investment, when made diierentially across the sexes,
DESERTING OFFSPRING Parental Investment as a Game of Chicken
We model mates’ interdependent parental investment decisions as a game of Chicken. An individual is better off (in terms of reproductive success) deserting one’s offspring to start a new union if
EVOLUTIONARY ASPECTS OF PARENTAL CARE IN THE COMMON GRACKLE, QUISCALUS QUISCULA L.
  • H. Howe
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1979
TLDR
The asymmetry of initial investment in grackles should, according to Trivers' assumptions, accentuate sexual differences in parental care and lead to frequent desertion of females by males.
Parental investment decision rules and the Concorde fallacy
TLDR
This work extends Williams' principle and develops an experimental design that would allow past investment and expected benefits to be varied independently, and illustrates the importance of the value of the brood relative to thevalue of future reproduction.
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