Parental Oxytocin and Early Caregiving Jointly Shape Children’s Oxytocin Response and Social Reciprocity

@article{Feldman2013ParentalOA,
  title={Parental Oxytocin and Early Caregiving Jointly Shape Children’s Oxytocin Response and Social Reciprocity},
  author={Ruth Feldman and I. A. S. Gordon and Moran Influs and Tamar Gutbir and Richard P. Ebstein},
  journal={Neuropsychopharmacology},
  year={2013},
  volume={38},
  pages={1154-1162}
}
Oxytocin (OT) has an important role in bond formation and social reciprocity, and animal studies indicate that OT functioning is transferred from parent to child through patterns of parental care. Perspectives on attachment suggest that the individual’s various attachment bonds are underpinned by the oxytocinergic system. However, prospective human studies that demonstrate the cross-generation transfer of OT as mediated by early caregiving and its impact on children’s multiple attachments are… CONTINUE READING
Related Discussions
This paper has been referenced on Twitter 6 times. VIEW TWEETS

From This Paper

Figures, tables, and topics from this paper.

Explore Further: Topics Discussed in This Paper

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 50 extracted citations

Neurohormones and temperament interact during infant development.

Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences • 2018

Beyond the social stereotypes of hormones.

Psychoneuroendocrinology • 2017
View 1 Excerpt

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 61 references

Hidden regulators in attachment, separation, and loss.

Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development • 1994
View 3 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Toddlers’ emerging ways of acheiving social coordinations with a peer

CO Eckerman, CC Davies, SM Didow
Child Dev 60: 440–453. • 1989
View 1 Excerpt
Highly Influenced

Peer interaction of young children

C Howes
Society for Research in Child Development: Chicago, Ill. • 1988
View 1 Excerpt
Highly Influenced

Nongenetic Transmission of Information

View 1 Excerpt
Highly Influenced

Oxytocin and social affiliation in humans.

Hormones and behavior • 2012
View 2 Excerpts

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…