Parental Care: The Key to Understanding Endothermy and Other Convergent Features in Birds and Mammals.

@article{Farmer2000ParentalCT,
  title={Parental Care: The Key to Understanding Endothermy and Other Convergent Features in Birds and Mammals.},
  author={Farmer},
  journal={The American naturalist},
  year={2000},
  volume={155 3},
  pages={
          326-334
        }
}
  • Farmer
  • Published 2000
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The American naturalist
  • Birds and mammals share a number of features that are remarkably similar but that have evolved independently. One of these characters, endothermy, has been suggested to have played a cardinal role in avian and mammalian evolution. I hypothesize that it is parental care, rather than endothermy, that is the key to understanding the amazing convergence between mammals and birds. Endothermy may have arisen as a consequence of selection for parental care because endothermy enables a parent to… CONTINUE READING

    Topics from this paper.

    Is parental care the key to understanding endothermy in birds and mammals?
    31
    Did pathogens facilitate the rise of endothermy
    1
    The evolution of mechanisms involved in vertebrate endothermy
    4
    Reproduction: the adaptive significance of endothermy.
    58
    A phenology of the evolution of endothermy in birds and mammals
    37

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