Parental Autonomy and the Obligation Not to Harm One's Child Genetically

@article{Green1997ParentalAA,
  title={Parental Autonomy and the Obligation Not to Harm One's Child Genetically},
  author={Ronald M Green},
  journal={The Journal of Law, Medicine \& Ethics},
  year={1997},
  volume={25},
  pages={15 - 5}
}
  • R. Green
  • Published 1 March 1997
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics
Examines the potential use of genetic information by parents in ways that offer no preventive or curative effects and that may in fact inflict harm on children. 

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