Parent-offspring cooperation in the blue-footed boody (Sula nebouxii): social roles in infanticial brood reduction

@article{Drummond2004ParentoffspringCI,
  title={Parent-offspring cooperation in the blue-footed boody (Sula nebouxii): social roles in infanticial brood reduction},
  author={Hugh Drummond and Edda Gonz{\'a}lez and Jos{\'e} Luis Osorno},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={19},
  pages={365-372}
}
SummaryReproduction in the blue-footed boody was examined for evidence of parent-offspring conflict over infanticidal reduction of the brood. Parental investment was analysed by measuring clutch characteristics, and chick growth and mortality in four seasons. Direct observations were made of behavioral development to determine the social roles of family members. The modal clutch was two similar-sized eggs, which hatched 4.0 days apart due to a 5.1-day laying interval and immediate incubation of… Expand

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