Parasitism, mutation accumulation and the maintenance of sex

@article{Howard1994ParasitismMA,
  title={Parasitism, mutation accumulation and the maintenance of sex},
  author={R. Stephen Howard and Curtis M. Lively},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1994},
  volume={367},
  pages={554-557}
}
Two classes of models attempt to explain why obligate parthenogenesis only rarely replaces sexual reproduction in natural populations, in spite of the apparent reproductive advantage that parthenogens gain by producing only female offspring1. The mutation-accumulation models suggest that sex is adaptive because it purges the genome of harmful recurrent mutations2,3. The ecological genetic models postulate that sex is adaptive in variable environments, particularly when the relevant variation is… Expand
Selection by parasites for clonal diversity and mixed mating
TLDR
Computer simulations show that repeated mutation to parthenogenesis can lead to the accumulation of clones with different resistance genotypes, and that a moderately diverse set of clones could competitively exclude the ancestral sexual subpopulation. Expand
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  • C. Lively, R. S. Howard
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  • Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 1994
TLDR
Computer simulations show that repeated mutation to parthenogenesis can lead to the accumulation of clones with different resistance genotypes, and that a moderately diverse set of clones could competitively exclude the ancestral sexual subpopulation. Expand
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TLDR
The results suggest that antagonistic interactions between early multicellular organisms and transmissible cancers are unlikely to be responsible for the evolution and maintenance of sexual reproduction. Expand
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TLDR
It is confirmed that vertical transmission of cancerous cells can promote the evolution of sex through a separate mechanism, known as similarity selection, that does not depend on coevolutionary fluctuations. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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