Parasitic weed incidence and related economic losses in rice in Africa

@article{Rodenburg2016ParasiticWI,
  title={Parasitic weed incidence and related economic losses in rice in Africa},
  author={Jonne Rodenburg and Matty Demont and Sander J. Zwart and Lammert Bastiaans},
  journal={Agriculture, Ecosystems \& Environment},
  year={2016},
  volume={235},
  pages={306-317}
}
Parasitic weeds pose increasing threats to rain-fed rice production in Africa. Most important species are Striga asiatica, S. aspera and S. hermonthica in rain-fed uplands, and Rhamphicarpa fistulosa in rain-fed lowlands. Information on the regional spread and economic importance of parasitic weeds in cereal production systems is scant. This article presents the first multi-species, multi-country, single-crop impact assessment of parasitic weeds in Africa. A systematic search of public… 

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