Parasitic plants as facilitators: more Dryad than Dracula?

@article{Watson2009ParasiticPA,
  title={Parasitic plants as facilitators: more Dryad than Dracula?},
  author={David M. Watson},
  journal={Journal of Ecology},
  year={2009},
  volume={97}
}
  • D. Watson
  • Published 1 November 2009
  • Environmental Science
  • Journal of Ecology
1 Despite being components of most vegetation types, the community‐level effects of parasitic plants are often ignored. The few studies adopting a broader view have revealed that these plants mediate a series of direct and indirect competitive and facilitative effects on community structure and ecosystem processes. 2 I summarize findings from the two best‐studied systems: a set of experimental and manipulative studies from northern Sweden and an integrated research programme in southern… 
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