Parasites of Harmonia axyridis: current research and perspectives

@article{Haelewaters2016ParasitesOH,
  title={Parasites of Harmonia axyridis: current research and perspectives},
  author={D. Haelewaters and Serena Y. Zhao and S. Clusella-Trullas and T. Cottrell and A. Kesel and L. Fiedler and A. Herz and H. Hesketh and C. Hui and R. Kleespies and J. Losey and I. Minnaar and Katie M. Murray and O. Nedvěd and W. P. Pfliegler and C. L. Raak-van den Berg and E. Riddick and D. Shapiro-Ilan and R. R. Smyth and T. Steenberg and P. S. Wielink and Sandra Vigl{\'a}{\vs}ov{\'a} and Zihua Zhao and P. Ceryngier and H. Roy},
  journal={BioControl},
  year={2016},
  volume={62},
  pages={355-371}
}
Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) has been introduced widely for biological control of agricultural pests. Harmonia axyridis has established in four continents outside of its native range in Asia and it is considered an invasive alien species (IAS). Despite a large body of work on invasion ecology, establishment mechanisms of IAS and their interactions with natural enemies remain open questions. Parasites, defined as multicellular organisms that do not directly kill the host, could… Expand

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TLDR
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BackgroundThe harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is native to central and eastern Asia and was purposely introduced into Europe to control aphids. While itExpand
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