Parasite adaptation to locally common host genotypes

@article{Lively2000ParasiteAT,
  title={Parasite adaptation to locally common host genotypes},
  author={C. Lively and M. Dybdahl},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2000},
  volume={405},
  pages={679-681}
}
According to the Red Queen hypothesis—which states that interactions among species (such as hosts and parasites) lead to constant natural selection for adaptation and counter-adaptation—the disproportionate evolutionary success of parasites on common host genotypes leads to correlated selection for sexual reproduction and local adaptation by the parasite population. Here we determined whether local adaptation is due to disproportionate infection of common host genotypes, and, if so, whether… Expand
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