Paranormal believers are more prone to illusory agency detection than skeptics

@article{Elk2013ParanormalBA,
  title={Paranormal believers are more prone to illusory agency detection than skeptics},
  author={Michiel van Elk},
  journal={Consciousness and Cognition},
  year={2013},
  volume={22},
  pages={1041-1046}
}
  • M. Elk
  • Published 1 September 2013
  • Psychology
  • Consciousness and Cognition

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