Parallel Declines in Pollinators and Insect-Pollinated Plants in Britain and the Netherlands

@article{Biesmeijer2006ParallelDI,
  title={Parallel Declines in Pollinators and Insect-Pollinated Plants in Britain and the Netherlands},
  author={Jacobus C. Biesmeijer and Stuart P. M. Roberts and Menno Reemer and Ralf Ohlem{\"u}ller and Mike Edwards and Theo M.J. Peeters and Andr{\'e} P. Schaffers and Simon G. Potts and Roy Kleukers and Chris D. Thomas and Josef Settele and William E. Kunin},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={313},
  pages={351 - 354}
}
Despite widespread concern about declines in pollination services, little is known about the patterns of change in most pollinator assemblages. By studying bee and hoverfly assemblages in Britain and the Netherlands, we found evidence of declines (pre-versus post-1980) in local bee diversity in both countries; however, divergent trends were observed in hoverflies. Depending on the assemblage and location, pollinator declines were most frequent in habitat and flower specialists, in univoltine… Expand

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