Paradoxical False Memory for Objects After Brain Damage

@article{McTighe2010ParadoxicalFM,
  title={Paradoxical False Memory for Objects After Brain Damage},
  author={Stephanie M. McTighe and Rosemary A. Cowell and Boyer D. Winters and Timothy J. Bussey and Lisa M. Saksida},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={330},
  pages={1408 - 1410}
}
Novel or Familiar? Amnesia is characterized by a number of memory deficits, including the apparent inability to distinguish between novel and familiar stimuli. McTighe et al. (p. 1408; see the Perspective by Eichenbaum) observed that the recognition memory of brain-damaged rats in a standard model of amnesia was impaired not because previously experienced objects seemed to be novel, but because objects not previously experienced seemed to be familiar. Furthermore, simply placing the animal in a… Expand
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