Pannexin 1 channels mediate the release of ATP into the lumen of the rat urinary bladder

@article{Beckel2015Pannexin1C,
  title={Pannexin 1 channels mediate the release of ATP into the lumen of the rat urinary bladder},
  author={J. Beckel and S. Daugherty and P. Tyagi and A. Wolf-Johnston and L. Birder and C. Mitchell and W. C. Groat},
  journal={The Journal of Physiology},
  year={2015},
  volume={593}
}
ATP is released through pannexin channels into the lumen of the rat urinary bladder in response to distension or stimulation with bacterial endotoxins. Luminal ATP plays a physiological role in the control of micturition because intravesical perfusion of apyrase or the ecto‐ATPase inhibitor ARL67156 altered reflex bladder activity in the anaesthetized rat. The release of ATP from the apical and basolateral surfaces of the urothelium appears to be mediated by separate mechanisms because… Expand
Expression and localization of pannexin-1 and CALHM1 in porcine bladder and their involvement in modulating ATP release.
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The results presented here provide compelling evidence that pannexin-1 and CALHM1, which are densely expressed in the porcine bladder, function as ATP release channels in response to bladder distension. Expand
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  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of physiology. Renal physiology
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The data indicate that urothelial ATP release is finely regulated by stretch speed, magnitude, and direction, and extracellular ATP signaling is likely to be differentially regulated by ectonucleotidase, which results in temporally and spatially distinct ATP kinetics in response to mechanical stretch. Expand
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TLDR
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Role of pannexins in vasculature
Pannexins are newly discovered proteins that were first discovered by Panchin in 2000. The pannexin family has three isomers, i.e. pannexin-1, pannexin-2, and pannexin-3. In 2011, Billaud et alExpand
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