Panmixia: an example from Dawson's burrowing bee (Amegilla dawsoni) (Hymenoptera: Anthophorini)

@article{Beveridge2006PanmixiaAE,
  title={Panmixia: an example from Dawson's burrowing bee (Amegilla dawsoni) (Hymenoptera: Anthophorini)},
  author={M. Beveridge and L. Simmons},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2006},
  volume={15}
}
Dawson's burrowing bee is a large, fast‐flying solitary nesting bee endemic to the arid zone of Western Australia. In this study the population structure of the species was examined with molecular markers. Using eight microsatellite loci, we genotyped 531 adult female bees collected from 13 populations of Dawson's burrowing bee, Amegilla dawsoni, across the species range. The mean number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 38 and expected heterozygosity was uniformly high with a mean of 0.602… Expand
Mediterranean lineage endemism, cold-adapted palaeodemographic dynamics and recent changes in population size in two solitary bees of the genus Anthophora
TLDR
Both nuclear and mitochondrial markers show a significant genetic differentiation of A. villosula from A. plumipes, supporting their status as separate species and suggesting asymmetric gene flow, primarily from continental Western Europe to the British Isles. Expand
Landscape effects on extremely fragmented populations of a rare solitary bee, Colletes floralis
TLDR
The results highlight the need for urgent site‐specific management action to halt the decline of this and potentially other rare solitary bees and GIS‐based landscape genetic analysis reveals urban areas as a potential and substantial barrier to gene flow. Expand
Does recent habitat fragmentation affect the population genetics of a heathland specialist, Andrena fuscipes (Hymenoptera: Andrenidae)?
TLDR
An analysis of the genetic structure of 12 populations of A. fuscipes using eight microsatellite loci shows little geographical structure and the degree of genetic differentiation was low, which seems to be mainly affected by the bees’ solitary nesting behaviour. Expand
Wege der Mikroevolution und Artbildung bei Bienen (Apoidea, Hymenoptera): Populationsgenetische und empirische Aspekte
TLDR
Bees have less genetic adaptability to environmental change, for which they compensate by exhibiting higher learning ability and greater behavioural plasticity than many other insect taxa, and possible paths of population divergence and speciation are pointed out. Expand
Panmixia on a continental scale in a widely distributed colonial waterbird
TLDR
The lack of any genetic structure across the range of American white pelicans indicates that, unlike other waterbirds with similar life-history characteristics, extensive gene flow and presumably low philopatry appear to preclude genetic differentiation. Expand
Linking Isotopes and Panmixia: High Within-Colony Variation in Feather δ2H, δ13C, and δ15N across the Range of the American White Pelican
TLDR
The high degree of within-site isotopic variation and lack of geographically-defined isotopic clusters preclude the establishment of an isotopic basemap for American white pelicans, but may indicate that a high incidence of long-distance dispersal is facilitating gene flow, leading to genetic panmixia. Expand
Emergence and dispersal relative to natal nest in the digger wasp Stizus continuus (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae).
TLDR
Differences between the number of females that nested relatively close or far from their emergence holes (EH) were either significant or not, depending on the year, and observed dispersal distances from the natal nests did not differ from those obtained by random simulations. Expand
High female mediated gene flow on a continental 1 scale in the polyandrous Kentish Plover Charadrius
31 Gene flow promotes genetic homogeneity of species in time and space. Gene flow can be 32 modulated by sex-biased dispersal which links population genetics to mating systems. 33 We investigated theExpand
Comparative phylogeography in the Atlantic forest and Brazilian savannas: pleistocene fluctuations and dispersal shape spatial patterns in two bumblebees
TLDR
This study asks which processes best explain the patterns of genetic variation observed in B. morio and B. pauloensis, shedding light on the phenomena that shaped the range of local populations and the spatial distribution of intra-specific lineages. Expand
High gene flow on a continental scale in the polyandrous Kentish plover Charadrius alexandrinus
TLDR
A prominent role for polyandrous females is suggested in maintaining genetic homogeneity across large geographic distances in the phylogeography of the Kentish plover Charadrius alexandrinus. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 48 REFERENCES
Ecology and behaviour of the bee Amegilla (Asaropoda) dawsoni (Rayment) with notes on a related species (Hymenoptera: Anthophoridae)
TLDR
Australia's largest anthophorine bee, annually produces a single generation from July to September and the biology of A megilla (Asaropoda) is briefly discussed and compared with that of other Anthophorini. Expand
Genetic differentiation of continental and island populations of Bombus terrestris (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in Europe
TLDR
Microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA data call for the protection of the island populations of B. terrestris against importation of bumble bees of foreign origin which are used as crop pollinators as well as a severe bottleneck in the Canary island population. Expand
Population structure of plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) in northern Europe: microsatellites revealed large‐scale spatial and temporal homogeneity
TLDR
The presence of significant heterozygote deficiencies at all locations (not due to null alleles) suggests a temporal Wahlund effect yet the absence of significant population differentiation among continental shelf localities makes this explanation alone, difficult to reconcile. Expand
Microsatellite loci for Dawson's burrowing bee (Amegilla dawsoni) and their cross‐utility in other Amegilla species
TLDR
Microsatellite loci were isolated from Dawson's burrowing bee, Amegilla dawsoni, and will be used for sex determination and the examination of mating frequency in this species. Expand
Can minor males of Dawson's burrowing bee, Amegilla dawsoni (Hymenoptera: Anthophorini) compensate for reduced access to virgin females through sperm competition?
TLDR
All aspects of the bee's mating system strongly indicate that sperm competition does not occur in Dawson’s burrowing bee, so that minors cannot compensate even partially via sperm competition for their mating disadvantage with virgin females. Expand
Genetic divergence of peripherally disjunct populations of the gastropod Batillariella estuarina in the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia
TLDR
Characteristic of peripheral isolates, the pond populations have less polymorphism and fewer alleles than the more connected populations at Albany, and these results indicate the potential evolutionary significance of peripherally isolated marine polpulations in the unusual habitats of the Abrolhos Islands. Expand
The population genetic structure of a large temperate pollinator species, Bombus pascuorum (Scopoli) (Hymenoptera: Apidae)
TLDR
Estimates of the number of migrants exchanged among populations north of the Alps suggest that historical events may have left a strong imprint on population structure, and distribution of mtDNA haplotypes supports this view and presents direct evidence for gene flow across the Alps. Expand
Nest architecture and genetic differentiation in a species complex of Australian stingless bees
TLDR
It is suggested that nest architecture characters are relevant but not sufficient criteria to identify species in this group, although modifications of nest architecture are probably not of prime importance in the speciation process of Australian stingless bees, although nest architecture differences probably result from relatively simple mechanisms. Expand
Panmixia in Pocillopora verrucosa from South Africa
TLDR
The homogeneity of the gene frequencies across the six reefs strongly supports the assumption that the KwaZulu-Natal reef complexes are highly connected by gene flow, and the reefs in the southern and central reef complexes along the northern Maputaland coastline can therefore be considered part of a single population. Expand
Genetic evidence against panmixia in the European eel
TLDR
Analysis of seven microsatellite loci among 13 samples from the north Atlantic, the Baltic Sea and the Mediterranean Sea basins reveals that there is global genetic differentiation, which implies non-random mating and restricted gene flow among eels from different sampled locations, which refute the hypothesis of panmixia. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...