Panic on the Streets of London: Police, Crime and the July 2005 Terror Attacks

@article{Draca2011PanicOT,
  title={Panic on the Streets of London: Police, Crime and the July 2005 Terror Attacks},
  author={Mirko Draca and Stephen J. Machin and Robert Witt},
  journal={SSRN Electronic Journal},
  year={2011}
}
In this paper we study the causal impact of police on crime by looking at what happened to crime before and after the terror attacks that hit central London in July 2005. The attacks resulted in a large redeployment of police officers to central London boroughs as compared to outer London - in fact, police deployment in central London increased by over 30 percent in the six weeks following the July 7 bombings. During this time crime fell significantly in central relative to outer London. Study… 

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