Pangolin genomes and the evolution of mammalian scales and immunity.

@article{Choo2016PangolinGA,
  title={Pangolin genomes and the evolution of mammalian scales and immunity.},
  author={Siew Woh Choo and Mike Rayko and Tze King Tan and Ranjeev Hari and Aleksey Komissarov and Wei Yee Wee and Andrey A. Yurchenko and Sergey F. Kliver and Gaik Tamazian and Agostinho Antunes and Richard K. Wilson and Wesley C. Warren and Klaus‐Peter Koepfli and Patrick Minx and Ksenia Krasheninnikova and Antoinette Kotz{\'e} and Desir{\'e} Lee Dalton and Elaine Vermaak and Ian Charles Paterson and Pavel Dobrynin and Frankie Thomas Sitam and Jeffrine Japning Rovie-Ryan and Warren E. Johnson and Aini Mohamed Yusoff and Shu-Jin Luo and Kayal Vizi Karuppannan and Gang Fang and Deyou Zheng and Mark B. Gerstein and Leonard Lipovich and Stephen J. O’Brien and Guat Jah Wong},
  journal={Genome research},
  year={2016},
  volume={26 10},
  pages={
          1312-1322
        }
}
Pangolins, unique mammals with scales over most of their body, no teeth, poor vision, and an acute olfactory system, comprise the only placental order (Pholidota) without a whole-genome map. To investigate pangolin biology and evolution, we developed genome assemblies of the Malayan (Manis javanica) and Chinese (M. pentadactyla) pangolins. Strikingly, we found that interferon epsilon (IFNE), exclusively expressed in epithelial cells and important in skin and mucosal immunity, is pseudogenized… 
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Comparative genomic analyses illuminate the distinct evolution of megabats within Chiroptera
  • M. Nikaido, S. Kondo, +13 authors C. Kai
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    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes
  • 2020
TLDR
The adaptive signatures discovered in the genomes of megabats may provide crucial insight into their distinct evolution, including key processes such as virus resistance, loss of echolocation, and frugivorous feeding.
NOD2 and reproduction-associated NOD-like receptors have been lost during the evolution of pangolins
TLDR
A massive degeneration of NLR genes in pangolins is shown and suggests that these endangered mammals may have unique adaptations of innate immunity and reproductive cell biology.
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The hypothesis that loss of IFIH1 and ZBP1 provided an evolutionary advantage by reducing inflammation-induced damage to host tissues and thereby contributed to a switch from resistance to tolerance of viral infections in pangolins is put forward.
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