Pamphilia's Cabinet: Gendered Authorship and Empire in Lady Mary Wroth's Urania

@article{Andrea2001PamphiliasCG,
  title={Pamphilia's Cabinet: Gendered Authorship and Empire in Lady Mary Wroth's Urania},
  author={Bernadette Diane Andrea},
  journal={ELH},
  year={2001},
  volume={68},
  pages={335 - 358}
}
14 Citations
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Wroth's Clause
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