Paleoclimatic Evidence for Future Ice-Sheet Instability and Rapid Sea-Level Rise

@article{Overpeck2006PaleoclimaticEF,
  title={Paleoclimatic Evidence for Future Ice-Sheet Instability and Rapid Sea-Level Rise},
  author={J. Overpeck and B. Otto‐Bliesner and G. Miller and D. Muhs and R. Alley and J. Kiehl},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={311},
  pages={1747 - 1750}
}
Sea-level rise from melting of polar ice sheets is one of the largest potential threats of future climate change. Polar warming by the year 2100 may reach levels similar to those of 130,000 to 127,000 years ago that were associated with sea levels several meters above modern levels; both the Greenland Ice Sheet and portions of the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be vulnerable. The record of past ice-sheet melting indicates that the rate of future melting and related sea-level rise could be faster than… Expand

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