Paleo-Eskimo genetic legacy across North America

@article{Flegontov2017PaleoEskimoGL,
  title={Paleo-Eskimo genetic legacy across North America},
  author={Pavel Flegontov and N. Ezgi Altınışık and Piya Changmai and Nadin Rohland and Swapan Mallick and Deborah A Bolnick and Francesca Candilio and Olga V Flegontova and Choongwon Jeong and Thomas K. Harper and Denise Keating and Douglas J. Kennett and Alexander M Kim and Thiseas Christos Lamnidis and I{\~n}igo Olalde and Jennifer A. Raff and Robert A. Sattler and Pontus Skoglund and Edward J. Vajda and Sergey Vasilyev and Elizaveta V. Veselovskaya and M. Geoffrey Hayes and Dennis H. O’Rourke and Ron Pinhasi and Johannes Krause and David Reich and Stephan Schiffels},
  journal={bioRxiv},
  year={2017}
}
Paleo-Eskimos were the first people to settle vast regions of the American Arctic around 5,000 years ago, and were subsequently joined and largely displaced around 1,000 years ago by ancestors of the present-day Inuit and Yupik. The genetic relationship between Paleo-Eskimos and Native American populations remains uncertain. We analyze ancient and present-day genome-wide data from the Americas and Siberia, including new data from Alaskan Iñupiat and West Siberian populations, and the first… Expand
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