Palaeontology: An insect to fill the gap

@article{Shear2012PalaeontologyAI,
  title={Palaeontology: An insect to fill the gap},
  author={William A. Shear},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2012},
  volume={488},
  pages={34-35}
}
  • W. Shear
  • Published 2 August 2012
  • Geography, Environmental Science, Biology
  • Nature
A complete insect fossil from the Devonian period has long been sought. The finding of a candidate may improve our patchy understanding of when winged insects evolved. See Letter p.82 The early evolutionary history of the insects is obscure. Fragmentary remains of insect-like arthropods are known from the Silurian to the mid-Devonian periods, 425 million to 385 million years ago, whereas modern insects are known from the Carboniferous period, around 345 million years ago. In between lies a gap… 
2 Citations
Is Strudiella a Devonian insect?
TLDR
It is believed that, like several other Devonian arthropod remains, Strudiella is not an insect, and utmost diligence should be taken in interpreting poorly preserved DevonianArthropods.
Garrouste et al. reply
TLDR
The Devonian insect Strudiella devonica has been denied by Hörnschemeyer et al., who could not “confirm the presence of a mandible or of mandibular teeth”.

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