Pain perception, somatosensory event-related potentials and skin conductance responses to painful stimuli in high, mid, and low hypnotizable subjects: effects of differential pain reduction strategies

@article{Pascalis1999PainPS,
  title={Pain perception, somatosensory event-related potentials and skin conductance responses to painful stimuli in high, mid, and low hypnotizable subjects: effects of differential pain reduction strategies},
  author={Vilfredo De Pascalis and Maria Rosaria Magurano and Anna Bellusci},
  journal={PAIN{\textregistered}},
  year={1999},
  volume={83},
  pages={499-508}
}
In this study, pain perception, somatosensory event-related potential (SERP) and skin conductance response (SCR) changes during hypnotic suggestions of Deep Relaxation, Dissociated Imagery, Focused Analgesia, and Placebo, compared with a Waking baseline condition, were investigated. SERPs were recorded from frontal, temporal, central, and parietal scalp sites. Ten high, 9 mid, and 10 low hypnotizable right-handed women participated in the experiment. The following measures were obtained: (1… 
Somatosensory event-related potential and autonomic activity to varying pain reduction cognitive strategies in hypnosis
TLDR
The effect of pain modulation is limited to high hypnotizable subjects rather than low hypnotizable ones, and higher frontal-temporal N2 and smaller posterior parietal P3 may indicate active inhibitory processes during cognitive strategies in hypnotic analgesia.
Focused analgesia in waking and hypnosis: Effects on pain, memory, and somatosensory event-related potentials
TLDR
Amplitude findings are seen as indicating that hypnotic analgesia can affect earlier and later stages of stimulus processing.
Subjects’ hypnotizability level affects somatosensory evoked potentials to non-painful and painful stimuli
TLDR
The results suggest a relationship between hypnotizability and cortical activity related to non-painful and painful stimuli in the condition of waking state (no hypnotic effect).
Pain perception, obstructive imagery and phase-ordered gamma oscillations.
  • V. De Pascalis, I. Cacace
  • Psychology, Medicine
    International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
  • 2005
TLDR
Evidence is provided for the role of gamma oscillations in the subjective experience of pain and for the view that pain reduction during obstructive mental imagery is the product of an inhibitory process involving frontal and parietal cortical regions.
Pain-Reduction Strategies in Hypnotic Context and Hypnosis: ERPs and SCRs During a Secondary Auditory Task
TLDR
Focused analgesia produced the most pain reduction in high, but not medium or low, hypnotizable subjects who showed shorter reaction times, higher central and parietal P300 peaks, and higher skin conductance responses.
Influence of body position, emotions, placebo and cognitive modulation on pain experience and pain-related somatosensory ERPs
The present work contributed to our understanding of the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying pain modulation through sensory, attentional, emotional and cognitive processes. We used subjective,
Attentional processes and cognitive performance during expectancy of painful galvanic stimulations: a high-resolution EEG study
TLDR
Findings provide further evidence on the fact that attentional processes at the basis of cognition can be defended by the anticipation of pain, at least when the incoming painful stimuli are repetitive and predictable.
Pain Modulation in Waking and Hypnosis in Women: Event-Related Potentials and Sources of Cortical Activity
TLDR
It is demonstrated that hypnotic suggestions can exert a top-down modulatory effect on attention/preconscious brain processes involved in pain perception by reducing the strength of the association of pain modulation and brain activity changes at BA3.
Perception and modulation of pain in waking and hypnosis: functional significance of phase-ordered gamma oscillations
TLDR
High and medium hypnotizable subjects showed significant reductions in phase‐ordered gamma patterns for Focused Analgesia during hypnosis and post‐hypnosis conditions; this effect was found, however, more pronounced in high hypnotized subjects, suggesting that hypnosis interferes with phase‐ ordered gamma and pain relationship.
Neuroelectric evidences of top-down hypnotic modulation associated with somatosensory processing of sensory and limbic regions
TLDR
Neurophysiological evidence is provided to the hypnotic regulation of somatosensory inputs outside of pain, that is since the earliest stage of thalamocortical processing.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 42 REFERENCES
Hypnotic analgesia: 1. Somatosensory event-related potential changes to noxious stimuli and 2. Transfer learning to reduce chronic low back pain.
TLDR
The authors document the development of self-efficacy through the successful transfer by participants of newly learned skills of experimental pain reduction to reduction of their own chronic pain through hypnotic analgesia.
Somatosensory event-related potential changes to painful stimuli during hypnotic analgesia: anterior cingulate cortex and anterior temporal cortex intracranial recordings.
TLDR
The present study is the first to demonstrate the involvement of the anterior cingulate cortex and the anterior temporal cortex in the control of pain with hypnotically suggested analgesia.
P300 event-related-potential amplitudes and evoked cardiac responses during hypnotic alteration of somatosensory perception.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that hypnotically induced obstructive hallucination to somatosensory stimuli involve alterations in neural and autonomic responses and are consistent with a trait conception of hypnotizability.
Hypnotic hypo- and hyperalgesia: divergent effects on pain ratings and pain-related cerebral potentials
TLDR
Pain ratings and pain‐related cerebral potentials in response to noxious stimuli were investigated under hypnotic hypo‐ or hyperalgesia and a dissociation of sensory and affective components of pain under hypnosis was discussed.
Laser-induced pain-related brain potentials and sensory pain ratings in high and low hypnotizable subjects during hypnotic suggestions of relaxation, dissociated imagery, focused analgesia, and placebo.
TLDR
Both high and low hypnotizable subjects exhibited significant reductions of reported pain during conditions of neutral hypnosis, relaxation, dissociated imagery, and focused analgesia, and both groups showed significant reductions in amplitudes when the data were recalculated to reflect relative changes compared to the average amplitude of the pre- and postconditions.
Visual evoked potentials, heart rate responses and memory to emotional pictorial stimuli.
  • D. Palomba, A. Angrilli, A. Mini
  • Psychology, Medicine
    International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
  • 1997
TLDR
Both pleasant and unpleasant slides induced larger positivity in the event-related potentials and were better remembered than neutral slides, and VEPs and memory data showed the same pattern.
Hypnotic analgesia reduces R-III nociceptive reflex: further evidence concerning the multifactorial nature of hypnotic analgesia
TLDR
Mechanisms of hypnotic analgesia were investigated by examining changes in the R‐III, a nociceptive spinal reflex, during hypnotic reduction of pain sensation and unpleasantness, suggesting that 3 general mechanisms may be involved in hypnotic morphine.
Cortical event-related potentials show the structure of hypnotic suggestions is crucial.
TLDR
The data show that when participants are carefully selected for hypnotizability and responses are time locked to events, rather robust physiological markers of hypnosis emerge, which reflect alterations in consciousness that correspond to participants' subjective experiences of perceptual alteration.
Quantitative evaluation of hypnotically suggested hyperaesthesia and analgesia by painful laser stimulation
TLDR
The sensory and pain thresholds to laser stimulation were determined, and the laser‐evoked brain potentials were measured for 8 highly hypnotically susceptible subjects in 3 conditions, indicating that slow endogenous mechanisms may play only a minor role in suggested hyperaesthesia/analgesia.
EEG asymmetry and heart rate during experience of hypnotic analgesia in high and low hypnotizables.
  • V. De Pascalis, M. Perrone
  • Psychology, Medicine
    International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
  • 1996
TLDR
During hypnotic analgesia the hemispheric asymmetry found in high hypnotizables was parallel to a significant reduction in the spectral mid-frequency peak of heart period variability which indicated a decrease in the level of sympathetic activity.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...