Pain perception, somatosensory event-related potentials and skin conductance responses to painful stimuli in high, mid, and low hypnotizable subjects: effects of differential pain reduction strategies

@article{Pascalis1999PainPS,
  title={Pain perception, somatosensory event-related potentials and skin conductance responses to painful stimuli in high, mid, and low hypnotizable subjects: effects of differential pain reduction strategies},
  author={Vilfredo De Pascalis and Maria Rosaria Magurano and Anna Bellusci},
  journal={PAIN{\textregistered}},
  year={1999},
  volume={83},
  pages={499-508}
}

Pain perception, obstructive imagery and phase-ordered gamma oscillations.

  • V. De PascalisI. Cacace
  • Psychology, Biology
    International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
  • 2005

Pain-Reduction Strategies in Hypnotic Context and Hypnosis: ERPs and SCRs During a Secondary Auditory Task

Focused analgesia produced the most pain reduction in high, but not medium or low, hypnotizable subjects who showed shorter reaction times, higher central and parietal P300 peaks, and higher skin conductance responses.

Influence of body position, emotions, placebo and cognitive modulation on pain experience and pain-related somatosensory ERPs

The present work contributed to the understanding of the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying pain modulation through sensory, attentional, emotional and cognitive processes by revealing the effects of body position, emotions, placebo expectations and cognitive reappraisal on subjective pain experience and pain-related somatosensory potentials.

Pain Modulation in Waking and Hypnosis in Women: Event-Related Potentials and Sources of Cortical Activity

It is demonstrated that hypnotic suggestions can exert a top-down modulatory effect on attention/preconscious brain processes involved in pain perception by reducing the strength of the association of pain modulation and brain activity changes at BA3.
...

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