Pain and the Placebo: What We Have Learned

@article{Hoffman2005PainAT,
  title={Pain and the Placebo: What We Have Learned},
  author={Ginger A. Hoffman and Anne Harrington and Howard L Fields},
  journal={Perspectives in Biology and Medicine},
  year={2005},
  volume={48},
  pages={248 - 265}
}
Despite the recent blossoming of rigorous research into placebo mechanisms and the long-standing use of placebos in clinical trials, there remains widespread and profound misunderstanding of the placebo response among both practicing physicians and clinical researchers. This review identifies and clarifies areas of current confusion about the placebo response (including whether it exists at all), describes its phenomenology, and outlines recent advances in our knowledge of its underlying… 

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