Paid vs. Volunteer Work in Open Source

@article{Riehle2014PaidVV,
  title={Paid vs. Volunteer Work in Open Source},
  author={Dirk Riehle and Philipp Riemer and Carsten Kolassa and Michael Schmidt},
  journal={2014 47th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences},
  year={2014},
  pages={3286-3295}
}
Many open source projects have long become commercial. This paper shows just how much of open source software development is paid work and how much has remained volunteer work. Using a conservative approach, we find that about 50% of all open source software development has been paid work for many years now and that many small projects are fully paid for by companies. However, we also find that any non-trivial project balances the amount of paid developer with volunteer work, and we suggest… Expand
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