PUTTING A BAND-AID ON A CORPSE: INCENTIVES FOR NURSES IN THE INDIAN PUBLIC HEALTH CARE SYSTEM.

@article{Banerjee2008PUTTINGAB,
  title={PUTTING A BAND-AID ON A CORPSE: INCENTIVES FOR NURSES IN THE INDIAN PUBLIC HEALTH CARE SYSTEM.},
  author={Abhijit Banerjee and Rachel Glennerster and Esther Duflo},
  journal={Journal of the European Economic Association},
  year={2008},
  volume={6 2-3},
  pages={
          487-500
        }
}
The public Indian health care system is plagued by high staff absence, low effort by providers, and limited use by potential beneficiaries who prefer private alternatives. This artice reports the results of an experiment carried out with a district administration and a nongovernmental organization (NGO). The presence of government nurses in government public health facilities (subcenters and aid-posts) was recorded by the NGO, and the government took steps to punish the worst delinquents… 

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