PTSD symptoms and dominant emotional response to a traumatic event: an examination of DSM-IV Criterion A2

@article{Hathaway2010PTSDSA,
  title={PTSD symptoms and dominant emotional response to a traumatic event: an examination of DSM-IV Criterion A2},
  author={Lisa M. Hathaway and Adriel Boals and Jonathan Britten Banks},
  journal={Anxiety, Stress, \& Coping},
  year={2010},
  volume={23},
  pages={119 - 126}
}
Abstract To qualify for a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) requires that individuals report experiencing dominant emotions of fear, helplessness, and horror during the trauma (Criterion A2). Despite this stipulation, traumatic events can elicit a myriad of emotions other than fear, such as anger, guilt or shame, sadness, and numbing. The present study examined which emotional reactions to a… Expand
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