• Corpus ID: 12875641

PSEUDODONTORNIS AND OTHER LARGE MARINE BIRDS FROM THE MIOCENE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

@inproceedings{Hopson1964PSEUDODONTORNISAO,
  title={PSEUDODONTORNIS AND OTHER LARGE MARINE BIRDS FROM THE MIOCENE OF SOUTH CAROLINA},
  author={James A. Hopson},
  year={1964}
}
  • J. Hopson
  • Published 1964
  • Environmental Science, Geography
While engaged in the reorganization of the vertebrate fossil collections at the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, the writer discovered the incomplete lower jaw of a large bird from the Miocene phosphate deposits near Charleston, South Carolina. The specimen is clearly referable to the family Pseudodontornithidae, an extinct group of very large oceanic birds characterized by the presence of vertical bony tooth-like processes, or, as the family name implies, pseudoteeth, on the… 

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