• Corpus ID: 115141874

PROXIMATE FACTORS INVOLVED IN RATTLESNAKE PREDATORY BEHAVIOR : A REVIEW

@inproceedings{Kenneth2002PROXIMATEFI,
  title={PROXIMATE FACTORS INVOLVED IN RATTLESNAKE PREDATORY BEHAVIOR : A REVIEW},
  author={Kenneth and Tamara L. Smith},
  year={2002}
}
Prey capture in rattlesnakes is built around chemichal means of predation (venom), replacing mechanical means (constriction, overpower). This provides a safer way to dispatch prey without the risks of injury from retaliation. Such a predatory strategy is based on an accurate strike, release of prey, and a precise subsequent relocation of struck prey. Radiation receptors (eyes, facial pits) represent input routes to guide the critical strike. Chemosensory inputs (olfactory, vomeronasal) guide… 

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