POTS, WORDS AND THE BANTU PROBLEM: ON LEXICAL RECONSTRUCTION AND EARLY AFRICAN HISTORY*

@article{Bostoen2007POTSWA,
  title={POTS, WORDS AND THE BANTU PROBLEM: ON LEXICAL RECONSTRUCTION AND EARLY AFRICAN HISTORY*},
  author={Koen Bostoen},
  journal={The Journal of African History},
  year={2007},
  volume={48},
  pages={173 - 199}
}
  • K. Bostoen
  • Published 1 July 2007
  • History
  • The Journal of African History
ABSTRACT Historical-comparative linguistics has played a key role in the reconstruction of early history in Africa. Regarding the ‘Bantu Problem’ in particular, linguistic research, particularly language classification, has oriented historical study and been a guiding principle for both historians and archaeologists. Some historians have also embraced the comparison of cultural vocabularies as a core method for reconstructing African history. This paper evaluates the merits and limits of this… 

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