• Corpus ID: 145512106

POSTTRAUMATIC IDENTITIES: DEVELOPING A CULTURALLY-INFORMED UNDERSTANDING OF POSTTRAUMATIC GROWTH IN RWANDAN WOMEN GENOCIDE SURVIVORS

@inproceedings{Williamson2014POSTTRAUMATICID,
  title={POSTTRAUMATIC IDENTITIES: DEVELOPING A CULTURALLY-INFORMED UNDERSTANDING OF POSTTRAUMATIC GROWTH IN RWANDAN WOMEN GENOCIDE SURVIVORS},
  author={Caroline Williamson},
  year={2014}
}
In the 1994 Rwanda genocide, an estimated 800,000 people were brutally murdered in just thirteen weeks. This violence affected all Rwandans, but women experienced the genocide in very specific ways. They were frequently raped, tortured and physically mutilated. Yet, because of their sexual value, the number of women who survived the genocide far outweighed the number of men, leaving them largely responsible for rebuilding Rwandan society. While it may seem abhorrent to suggest that anything… 
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