POSTGLACIAL POPULATION EXPANSION DRIVES THE EVOLUTION OF LONG‐DISTANCE MIGRATION IN A SONGBIRD

@article{Mil2006POSTGLACIALPE,
  title={POSTGLACIAL POPULATION EXPANSION DRIVES THE EVOLUTION OF LONG‐DISTANCE MIGRATION IN A SONGBIRD},
  author={Borja Mil{\'a} and Thomas B. Smith and Robert K. Wayne},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2006},
  volume={60}
}
Abstract The evolution of long‐distance migratory behavior from sedentary populations is a central problem in studies of animal migration. Three crucial issues that remain unresolved are: (1) the biotic and abiotic factors promoting evolution of migratory behavior, (2) the geographic origin of ancestral sedentary populations, and (3) the time scale over which migration evolves. We test the role of postglacial population expansions during the Quaternary in driving the evolution of songbird… 
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