PLUTO'S ATMOSPHERE FROM THE 2015 JUNE 29 GROUND-BASED STELLAR OCCULTATION AT THE TIME OF THE NEW HORIZONS FLYBY *

@article{Sicardy2016PLUTOSAF,
  title={PLUTO'S ATMOSPHERE FROM THE 2015 JUNE 29 GROUND-BASED STELLAR OCCULTATION AT THE TIME OF THE NEW HORIZONS FLYBY *},
  author={Bruno Sicardy and John Talbot and Erick Meza and J. I. B. Camargo and Josselin Desmars and Dave Gault and Dave Herald and Stephen Kerr and Hristo Pavlov and Felipe Braga-Ribas and Marcelo Assafin and Gustavo Benedetti-Rossi and A Dias-Oliveira and A. Ramos-Gomes-Jr. and Roberto Vieira-Martins and Diane B{\'e}rard and P Kervella and J. J. Lecacheux and Emmanuel Lellouch and Wolfgang Beisker and David W. Dunham and Martin Jel{\'i}nek and Ren{\'e} Duffard and Jos{\'e} Luis Ortiz and Alberto J. Castro-Tirado and Ronan Cunniffe and Richard R. Querel and Philip Yock and Andrew A. Cole and A. Barry Giles and K. M. Hill and Jean Philippe Beaulieu and Martina Harnisch and R. Jansen and Alison Pennell and S. Todd and William H. Allen and Paul B. Graham and Brian Loader and Graham Mckay and John Milner and S. Parker and M. A. Barry and John Thomas Bradshaw and J. Broughton and L. Davis and Hadrien A. R. Devillepoix and James R. Drummond and Les W. Field and M. Forbes and D. Giles and Robert T. Glassey and Ross W. Groom and Da Hooper and Raul Horvat and G. Hudson and R. Idaczyk and Darin Michael Jenke and B. Lade and Jeffrey A. Newman and P. Nosworthy and Patrick N. Purcell and P. F. Skilton and Margaret Streamer and Martin J. Unwin and H. Watanabe and Graeme L. White and Darach Watson},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2016},
  volume={819},
  pages={1-8}
}
We present results from a multi-chord Pluto stellar occultation observed on 2015 June 29 from New Zealand and Australia. This occurred only two weeks before the NASA New Horizons flyby of the Pluto system and serves as a useful comparison between ground-based and space results. We find that Pluto's atmosphere is still expanding, with a significant pressure increase of 5 ± 2% since 2013 and a factor of almost three since 1988. This trend rules out, as of today, an atmospheric collapse associated… 

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