PLIOCENE RHINOCEROTIDAE (MAMMALIA) FROM HADAR AND DIKIKA (LOWER AWASH, ETHIOPIA), AND A REVISION OF THE ORIGIN OF MODERN AFRICAN RHINOS

@inproceedings{Geraads2005PLIOCENER,
  title={PLIOCENE RHINOCEROTIDAE (MAMMALIA) FROM HADAR AND DIKIKA (LOWER AWASH, ETHIOPIA), AND A REVISION OF THE ORIGIN OF MODERN AFRICAN RHINOS},
  author={Denis Geraads},
  year={2005}
}
Abstract Fossil representatives of the two extant African rhinoceros lineages, Ceratotherium and Diceros, co-occur in the Pliocene deposits of the Hadar Formation, Ethiopia. Both arose, in turn, from Ceratotherium neumayri of the late Miocene. The first of these Pliocene species, Ceratotherium mauritanicum, can be distinguished from the living C. simum, to which it probably gave rise in the earliest Pleistocene, by its less plagiolophodont cheek teeth. The second, Diceros praecox, is closely… 

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