PLANETARY CANDIDATES OBSERVED BY KEPLER. III. ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST 16 MONTHS OF DATA

@inproceedings{Batalha2013PLANETARYCO,
  title={PLANETARY CANDIDATES OBSERVED BY KEPLER. III. ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST 16 MONTHS OF DATA},
  author={Natalie M. Batalha and Jason F. Rowe and Stephen T. Bryson and Thomas Barclay and C. J. Burke and Douglas A. Caldwell and Jessie L. Christiansen and Fergal Robert Mullally and Susan E. Thompson and Timothy M. Brown and A. K. Dupree and Daniel C. Fabrycky and Eric B. Ford and Jonathan J. Fortney and Ronald L. Gilliland and Howard T. Isaacson and David W. Latham and Geoffrey W. Marcy and Samuel N. Quinn and Darin A. Ragozzine and Avi Shporer and William J. Borucki and David R. Ciardi and Thomas Gautier and Michael R. Haas and Jon M. Jenkins and David G. Koch and Jack J. Lissauer and W. Rapin and Gibor Basri and Alan P. Boss and Lars A. Buchhave and David Charbonneau and J. Christensen-dalsgaard and Bruce D. Clarke and William D. Cochran and B. O. Demory and E. K. Devore and Gilbert A. Esquerdo and Mark E. Everett and François Fressin and John Charles Geary and Forrest R. Girouard and A. D. Gould and Jennifer R. Hall and Matthew J. Holman and Andrew W. Howard and Steve B. Howell and Khadeejah A. Ibrahim and Karen Kinemuchi and Hans Kjeldsen and Todd C. Klaus and Jie Li and P. W. Lucas and Robert L. Morris and Andrej Pr{\vs}a and Elisa V. Quintana and Dwight T. Sanderfer and Dimitar D. Sasselov and Shawn E. Seader and Jeffrey C. Smith and J. M. Still and Martin C. Stumpe and Jill Tarter and Peter Tenenbaum and Guillermo Torres and Joseph D. Twicken and Kamal Uddin and Jeffrey Edward van Cleve and Lucianne M. Walkowicz and William J. Schaff Department of Applied Physics and Astronomy and San Diego State University and Seti InstituteNASA Ames Research Center and Nasa Ames Research Center and Bay Area Environmental Research InstituteNASA Ames Res Center and Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network and Harvard--Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Department of Physics Astronomy and Astrophysics and University of Southern California and University of Central Florida and Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds and The Ohio State University and Berkeley and Nasa Exoplanet Science InstituteCaltech and Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology and Carnegie Institution of Washington and Niels Bohr Institute and University of Copenhagen and Centre for Star and Planet Formation and Natural History Museum of Denmark and Aarhus University and McDonald Observatory and The University of Texas and Department of Earth and Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences and Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Seti Institute and National Optical Astronomy Observatory and Orbital Sciences CorporationNASA Ames Research Center and Lawrence Hall of Science and Centre for Astrophysics and University of Hertfordshire and Villanova University and Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics and Department of Astrophysical Sciences and Princeton University. and San Diego State University and Department of Engineering Physics and Georgia State University},
  year={2013}
}
New transiting planet candidates are identified in 16 months (2009 May-2010 September) of data from the Kepler spacecraft. Nearly 5000 periodic transit-like signals are vetted against astrophysical and instrumental false positives yielding 1108 viable new planet candidates, bringing the total count up to over 2300. Improved vetting metrics are employed, contributing to higher catalog reliability. Most notable is the noise-weighted robust averaging of multi-quarter photo-center offsets derived… Expand
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