PLANET TRAPS AND PLANETARY CORES: ORIGINS OF THE PLANET–METALLICITY CORRELATION

@article{Hasegawa2014PLANETTA,
  title={PLANET TRAPS AND PLANETARY CORES: ORIGINS OF THE PLANET–METALLICITY CORRELATION},
  author={Yasuhiro Hasegawa and Ralph E. Pudritz},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2014},
  volume={794}
}
Massive exoplanets are observed preferentially around high metallicity ([Fe/H]) stars while low-mass exoplanets do not show such an effect. This so-called planet–metallicity correlation generally favors the idea that most observed gas giants at r < 10 AU are formed via a core accretion process. We investigate the origin of this phenomenon using a semi-analytical model, wherein the standard core accretion takes place at planet traps in protostellar disks where rapid type I migrators are halted… 

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The rapid growth of observed exoplanets has revealed the existence of several distinct planetary populations in the mass–period diagram. Two of the most surprising are (1) the concentration of gas

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