PHYLOGENY OF TITMICE (PARIDAE): II. SPECIES RELATIONSHIPS BASED ON SEQUENCES OF THE MITOCHONDRIAL CYTOCHROME-B GENE

@inproceedings{Gill2005PHYLOGENYOT,
  title={PHYLOGENY OF TITMICE (PARIDAE): II. SPECIES RELATIONSHIPS BASED ON SEQUENCES OF THE MITOCHONDRIAL CYTOCHROME-B GENE},
  author={Frank B. Gill and Beth Slikas and Frederick H. Sheldon},
  year={2005}
}
Abstract We present a phylogenetic hypothesis for 40 species in the bird family Paridae, based on comparisons of nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene. Parids, including tits and chickadees, are an older group than their morphological stereotypy suggests. The longest cytochrome-b distances between species reach 12% in uncorrected divergence. With the exception of one thrasher-like terrestrial tit species of the Tibetan plateau (Pseudopodoces humilis), morphological and… 

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