PERSISTENCE OF EGG RECOGNITION IN THE ABSENCE OF CUCKOO BROOD PARASITISM: PATTERN AND MECHANISM

@inproceedings{Lahti2006PERSISTENCEOE,
  title={PERSISTENCE OF EGG RECOGNITION IN THE ABSENCE OF CUCKOO BROOD PARASITISM: PATTERN AND MECHANISM},
  author={David C. Lahti},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2006}
}
  • D. Lahti
  • Published in
    Evolution; international…
    1 January 2006
  • Biology
Abstract Broad ecological shifts can render previously adaptive traits nonfunctional. It is an open question as to how and how quickly nonfunctional traits decay once the selective pressures that favored them are removed. The village weaverbird (Ploceus cucullatus) avoids brood parasitism by rejecting foreign eggs. African populations have evolved high levels of within-clutch uniformity as well as individual distinctiveness in egg color and spotting, a combination that facilitates… 
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