PATTERNS OF NEST PREDATION CONTRIBUTE TO POLYGYNY IN THE GREAT REED WARBLER

@article{Hansson2000PATTERNSON,
  title={PATTERNS OF NEST PREDATION CONTRIBUTE TO POLYGYNY IN THE GREAT REED WARBLER},
  author={B. Hansson and S. Bensch and D. Hasselquist},
  journal={Ecology},
  year={2000},
  volume={81},
  pages={319-328}
}
According to the polygyny threshold model, females are compensated for the cost of sharing a territory with other females by breeding in territories of higher quality than those of monogamously mated females. In the polygynous Great Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus), the variation in territory quality may be associated with nest site characteristics or food supply. In this study, we examined the probability of nest predation in Great Reed Warblers in relation to an indirect measure of… Expand

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